SEPOCTNOV
21
201620172018
2 captures
19 Oct 2017 - 21 Oct 2017
About this capture
HOME TECHNOLOGY
TECHNOLOGY
‘Automation a must in Cybersecurity’: Expert
22 hours ago
87 views

Jason Mical 
Layan Damanhouri
Saudi Gazette

Many organizations tend to lack the skillsets to respond efficiently as it’s not enough to simply detect a cyber threat, according to a cybersecurity expert.

‘Organizations believe that a firewall or anti-virus will immediately protect their systems,’ says Jason Mical, vice president of endpoint products at Fidelis Cybersecurity. ‘They think they’re safe until their wall starts crumbling and then they don’t know how to respond. They don’t know how to protect it or prevent a cyberattack in the first place.’

Such threats are not new, he explains, as ransomwares and hackers are now finding vulnerabilities they can exploit successfully.

With the rise of the internet of things and digital transformation, they pose a risk to not only computers but also home appliances, smart devices, TVs and even vehicles that now have IP addresses.

‘If recent attacks like WannyCry and Petya have taught us anything, it is that traditional security defences are no longer capable of combatting modern cyber-attacks and protecting organisations’ most sensitive data,’ says Mical. ‘Security teams without complete visibility across networks and endpoints don’t have the capability to prevent and detect threats, and the automation to maximize resources.’

Fidelis Cybersecurity, that has customers in the defense, government, and banking sectors in Saudi Arabia, designed its latest platform Fidelis Elevate with endpoint visibility to detect threats. Its automated detection and response capability aims to ensure protection from security incidents. A security team triages, investigates, remediates, and analyses security incidents.

In an event of an attack, security teams need to know if the attack reached the target, the activation of the attack, and what happened prior to and after the attack.

‘Investing in detection response and recovery is an area that is usually overlooked by leaders of an organization’, says Roland Daccache, regional sales engineer at Fidelis Cybersecurity. ‘Awareness is generally low among businesses.’

However, small businesses are equally vulnerable as large enterprises. ‘Anyone that has information is at risk,’ says Daccache. ‘There are hundreds of incidents on a weekly basis that target small businesses but don’t reach headlines in the news. If the hacker thinks the big fish in the pond is not accessible, they target smaller fish that are less protected in their security measures.’

22 hours ago
87 views
RELATED ARTICLES
October 19, 2017
Digital Souks
October 17, 2017
Video game part does double-duty — on a submarine
HIGHLIGHTS
16 hours ago
Dell to invest $1 billion in IoT R&D; over next three years
16 hours ago
King promotes Public Prosecution members
16 hours ago
Princess Reema should get Saudi women exercising
16 hours ago
Robot wears a different outfits for different tasks
WATCH NOW
Saudi band prods women to take the wheel in new YouTube video
More in TECHNOLOGY
SAUDI ARABIA
WORLD
OPINION
BUSINESS
TECHNOLOGY
SPORTS
LIFE
ABOUT US
EPAPER
CONTACT US
ADVERTISE
SOCIAL MEDIA
ARCHIVE
SUBSCRIBE
Copyright © 2016 www.saudigazette.com.sa - All rights reserved
Powered by NewsPress
SG Saudi Arabia Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman 545020 World Asia Mena Opinion Editorial Local Viewpoint Sports (From L) Caroline Garcia of France, Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark, Elina Svitolina of Ukraine, Simona Halep of Romania, Garbine Muguruza of Spain, Karolina Pliskova of Czech Republic, Venus Williams of the US and Jelena Ostapenko of Latvia pose during the draw ceremony of the WTA Finals in Singapore Friday. — AFP Hasan Ali (R) of Pakistan celebrates with teammate after dismissing Sadeera Samarawickrama of Sri Lanka during the third One-Day International cricket match against Sri Lanka Sharjah Cricket Stadium Friday. — AFP Business Russ Barck, global head of marketing & alliances, Dell Technologies Capital.Dubbed ‘Primer,’ a new cube-shaped robot can be controlled via magnets to make it walk, roll, sail, and glide. It carries out these actions by wearing different exoskeletons, which start out as sheets of plastic that fold into specific shapes when heated. After Primer finishes its task, it can shed its “skin” by immersing itself in water, which dissolves the exoskeleton. — Courtesy photo Technology Jason Mical  Life Explore Art & Culture