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CENTER FOR MIDDLE EAST POLICY
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Maldives: A crisis in paradise
Bruce Riedel Monday, August 13, 2018
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Trump wants a bigger, better deal with Iran. What does Tehran want?
Suzanne Maloney
Wednesday, August 8, 2018
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The U.S. “yellow light” in Yemen
Daniel L. Byman
Friday, August 3, 2018
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What does an empowered Saudi woman look like?
Tamara Cofman Wittes
Thursday, August 2, 2018
SPOTLIGHT: DEBATING THE IRAN NUCLEAR DEAL
Brookings experts examine what’s at stake—for the United States, Europe, Iran, and the Middle East more broadly—regarding the Iran nuclear deal, debate the agreement’s merits, and offer recommendations as to the deal’s future.
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As Trump mulls the Iran deal’s fate, a three-ring circus ensues
Suzanne Maloney Wednesday, May 2, 2018
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Israeli intelligence coup could help Trump “fix” the Iran deal
Robert Einhorn
Friday, May 4, 2018
MARKAZ
Why the Saudis would cheer the de-certification of the Iran deal
Bruce Riedel
Wednesday, October 11, 2017
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Suzanne Maloney and Thomas Wright
Friday, May 4, 2018
Learn more about Debating the Iran Nuclear Deal
MORE ON DEBATING THE IRAN DEAL
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The Trump administration’s Plan B on Iran is no plan at all
Suzanne Maloney
Tuesday, May 22, 2018
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In exiting the Iran deal, Trump left U.N. sanctions relief intact—why that could pose problems down the road
Richard Nephew
Thursday, May 17, 2018
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After dumping the nuclear deal, Trump has no strategy for Iran
Suzanne Maloney
Wednesday, May 9, 2018
VIEW DEBATING THE IRAN DEAL
EXPERTS
Eric Rosand
Nonresident Senior Fellow - Foreign Policy, Center for Middle East Policy, U.S. Relations with the Islamic World
Bruce Riedel
Senior Fellow - Foreign Policy, Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, Center for Middle East PolicyDirector - The Intelligence Project
Suzanne Maloney
Deputy Director - Foreign PolicySenior Fellow - Center for Middle East Policy, Energy Security and Climate Initiative
MaloneySuzanne
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RESEARCH
SYRIA
Beyond fragility: Syria and the challenges of reconstruction in fierce states
Steven HeydemannJune 2018
MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA
After Oslo: Rethinking the two-state solution
Khaled Elgindy
June 2018
THE PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES
How the peace process killed the two-state solution
Khaled Elgindy
Thursday, April 12, 2018
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EVENTS
2018
JUN
25
PAST EVENT
An alternative vision for Israel
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM EDT
Washington, DC
2018
MAY
17
PAST EVENT
The fallout of President Trump’s JCPOA decision
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM EDT
Washington, DC
2018
APR
24
PAST EVENT
The future of political Islam: Trends and prospects
9:30 AM - 11:00 AM EDT
Washington, DC
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BLOG POSTS
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The summer of Israel’s contentment
Shalom Lipner
Monday, July 30, 2018
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Iran isn’t taking Trump’s Twitter bait—for now
Suzanne Maloney
Thursday, July 26, 2018
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Iran’s dire, yet (for now) navigable straits
Dror Michman and Yael Mizrahi-Arnaud
Wednesday, July 25, 2018
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BOOKS
Rethinking Political Islam
By Shadi Hamid and William McCants
2017
Islamic Exceptionalism
By Shadi Hamid
2016
The ISIS Apocalypse: The History, Strategy, and Doomsday Vision of the Islamic State
By William McCants
VIEW ALL BOOKS
MORE ON CENTER FOR MIDDLE EAST POLICY
The main takeaway from Facebook's announcement is not just that Russia-style meddling is exportable, but that it's inevitable. If Moscow authored the playbook, Tehran read it word for word, and they won't be the only country to do so. Spreading disinformation on Facebook is so easy and effective that we need to assume every foreign adversary will now do it.
Chris Meserole
Los Angeles Times

Wednesday, August 22, 2018
The Iranians have a more complex political environment than North Korea. It’s relatively easy for Kim Jong-un to turn on a dime and take advantage of an opportunity; it’s much harder for them to turn on a dime.
Iran, Ms. Maloney noted, reacted relatively calmly to Mr. Trump’s tweet. The country’s leaders, she said, believe that the president is trying to bait them to breach the nuclear deal, which they do not want to do. But his threats are rattling the Iranians, who worry that Mr. Trump’s aides might goad him into a confrontation.
“This is moving quickly,” she said, “and the president has an establishment around him that seems eager for some kind of dust-up with Iran.”
Suzanne Maloney
New York Times

Monday, July 23, 2018
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Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have a disastrous Yemen strategy
Daniel L. Byman
Tuesday, July 17, 2018
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