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01 Jul 2014 - 29 Oct 2020
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201920202021
PROJECT
Who Takes Care of Nanny's Children?
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When Filipino women leave their families to find work abroad, they view migration as a necessary sacrifice to obtain the two things that will secure a future for their children: a home and an education.
But for the some 96,000 women who left the Philippines in 2010 to work as domestic workers, this simple aspiration comes at a cost that cannot be translated into monetary terms.
A mother’s presence is deferred for the promise of economic gain. Years that would have been spent seeing her children grow up are spent watching over other people’s children.
And for the many who are working as undocumented migrants, there is no option to travel back to the Philippines to visit. The separation drags on for years.
Roughly 10 percent, or $18.6 billion of the country’s GDP, comes from remittances sent home by migrant workers. Almost half of the migrant workers from the Philippines are women, filling vacancies in the service sector mostly as nannies and domestic helpers.
Over the last several years, the Philippine government has posted the highest GDP growth in the region—but the country continues to have the highest rate of unemployment.
For many women, migrating to find work becomes a cycle of leaving and coming back, only to leave again when economic opportunities in the Philippines prove to be insufficient.
And even if they want to come home, what do they have to come home to? In this project Ana P. Santos, the Pulitzer Center's 2014 Persephone Miel fellow, documents the plight of these women and the families they have left behind.
Stories
Pulitzer Center Updates
Media
January 08, 2019 | Rappler
Hair by Willy Leyba, Paris-Based Hairdresser
ANA P. SANTOS
Growing up in the Philippines, Willy Leyba dreamed of one day having her own beauty salon. She never imagined she would open one in Paris.
June 30, 2017 | Medium
In Labor: Lack of Sex Education Impacting Female Labor Migrants
ANA P. SANTOS
The impact of not teaching sex education is hurting migrant women. It leaves them unprepared for the physical and psychological realities of working abroad.
May 01, 2017 | Rappler
UAE: Labor Day Tribute to a Migrant Mother
ANA P. SANTOS
'I dream of the day when we can all be together again', overseas Filipino worker Norma Brion tells her children.
April 18, 2016 | Gulf News
Difficult Sunset Years for Filipino Migrants
ANA P. SANTOS
It’s been 40 years since the Philippines began state-sponsored labor migration. Now, ageing workers want to return home for good. Will they retire into the same poverty they first tried to escape?
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When a Filipino woman leaves her home to work overseas as a nanny, she knows that it will be years before she sees her own children again.
AUTHOR
ANA P. SANTOS
Grantee
Ana P. Santos is an independent journalist whose work focuses on reproductive health rights, gender issues, and the inequalities that result from living in the only country in the world without...
RELATED INFORMATION
LAUNCHED:
May 22, 2014
REGION:
Asia
COUNTRY:
Philippines
TAGS:
Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees, Economy, Human Rights, Labor
CLASSROOM SUBJECTS:
Social Studies
RECENT EVENTS
February 7, 2017
The Hidden Lives of Migrant Workers
November 24, 2014
Pulitzer Center Journalists at the Ateneo de Manila University
November 13, 2014
Talks @ Pulitzer: Ana Santos on "Who Takes Care of Nanny's Children?"
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Children and Youth
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