17 Jul 2020 - 05 May 2022
NOVJANMAR
25
202020212022
ISSUE
Indigenous Communities
Three hundred and seventy million Indigenous people from more than 5,000 Indigenous communities speak more than 4,000 languages and are spread across over 90 countries. Representing just 5 percent of the world’s population, Indigenous communities protect about 80 percent of the world’s biodiversity. Because of widespread discrimination, Indigenous people make up 15 percent of the world’s extreme poor and are disproportionately affected by land theft, malnutrition, and internal displacement compared to other communities. 
The challenges facing Indigenous communities come from centuries-long systems of oppression. Today, Indigenous people are being accused of terrorism and treason for undertaking peaceful efforts to maintain their cultural identity or traditional lands. Journalism can shed light on discriminatory practices and conflicts underpinning these challenges and many more, from root causes to examples of resilience. Quality journalism can elevate voices from Indigenous communities and should dispel stereotypes. Part of this misrepresentation is the result of a lack of Indigenous voices and stories in traditional media. A survey of members of the News Leaders Association showed that less than 0.05 percent of journalists in leading media outlets are Native American and a Nieman report found that Indigenous people represented only 0.6 percent of people portrayed in stories by the 20 most-trafficked internet news sites.  The Pulitzer Center is uniquely positioned to bring these often under-reported or misreported issues and under-represented perspectives to new audiences. 
These stories include High Country News years-long investigation into Indigenous land theft to benefit America’s public universities, “Nowhere to Turn,” a project uncovering the inequitable treatment of Alaska Native sexual assault survivors published by both The Associated Press and National Native News, and “Panama at the Crossroads,” an interactive multimedia project by Sol Lauría and Guido Bilbao uplifting the decades-long fight for land protection by the Gnäbe and Buglé people.   
 
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Pulitzer Center Updates
January 21, 2021 | InfoAmazonia
Water Diversion To Belo Monte Impacts Fish Reproduction on Xingu River (Portuguese)
FÁBIO ZUKER
Without fish, people of the Xingu Great Bend face the pandemic with food insecurity. 
January 17, 2021 | IDN Times
12 Portraits of Biodiversity in Pekalongan Tropical Rainforest (bahasa Indonesia)
DHANA KENCANA
Flora and fauna are well preserved even outside the conservation area.
January 14, 2021 | The New Yorker
How One Paper Is Covering COVID-19 in the Most Under-Connected Part of the U.S.
ELÉONORE LÉO HAMELIN
Local journalists cover the pandemic and the effect it has on The Navajo Nation.
January 06, 2021 | De Olho nos Ruralistas, El Pais
The Political Arc of Deforestation (Portuguese)
ALCEU LUÍS CASTILHO AND LEONARDO FUHRMANN
"The Political Arc of Deforestation" tracks the political fingerprints behind the destruction of the Amazon rainforest.
December 29, 2020 | Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil, Terra Arrasada
Scorched Earth: The Ones Hit by Belo Monte (Portuguese)
FÁBIO ZUKER
Riverine populations expelled from their homes years ago face the pandemic while still trying to reorganize their lives.
December 24, 2020 | Le Monde Diplomatique Brasil, Terra Arrasada
Scorched Earth: Yanomami, Invasions and Epidemics (Portuguese)
FÁBIO ZUKER, RENATA MACHADO TUPINAMBÁ, AND CLARISSA LEVY
A journalist and indigenous poet brings interviews and reports from the Yanomami indigenous people and sertanistas about how mining has always been, and still is, a source of violence, death and disease.
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“We will illuminate dark places and, with a deep sense of responsibility, interpret these troubled times.”
—Joseph Pulitzer III (1913-1993)
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