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TUNISIA
CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Tunisia: Human rights must be upheld following suspension of parliament
Tunisian President Kais Saied should publicly commit to respecting and protecting human rights, including the rights to freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly, after he suspended parliament and assumed some judicial powers, said Amnesty International. Concerns that human rights are at risk have heightened following an alarming raid by security forces on Al Jazeera’s office in Tunis today and the president’s threats during his speech of resorting to heavy-handed force against “those threatening state security”.
Date: 26 July 2021
NEWS
EUROPE AND CENTRAL ASIADETENTION
The US diplomatic assurances are inherently unreliable. Julian Assange must be released
This month, the Biden Administration offered diplomatic assurances to the British authorities that if they allow the extradition of Julian Assange to the United States, the Administration will not imprison him in the most extreme American prison, ADX Florence, and will not subject him to the harsh regime known as “Special Administrative Measures” (SAMs). Il Fatto Quotidiano’s Stefania Maurizi asked Julia Hall for an analysis of these assurances and for comment on the Pegasus scandal, which Amnesty International has greatly contributed to exposing.
Date: 26 July 2021
RESEARCH
BANGLADESH
CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Bangladesh: No Space for Dissent - Bangladesh's Crackdown on Freedom of Expression Online
Bangladeshi authorities have imprisoned at least 433 individuals under the country’s draconian Digital Security Act (DSA), according to the country’s Department of Prisons as of 11 July 2021. This briefing examines cases under the DSA - a law that contains overbroad and vague provisions granting the authorities extensive powers to police the online space - against 10 individuals who have been subjected to a wide range of human rights violations including enforced disappearance, arbitrary detention and torture, simply for criticising powerful people on social media.
Date: 26 July 2021Ref:ASA 13/4294/2021
RESEARCH
BANGLADESH
CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Bangladesh: #UnGagDissent in Bangladesh: Activist Toolkit
The Digital Security Act (DSA) in Bangladesh is a draconian law often used by authorities to crackdown on dissenting voices online. Dissent is not a crime. Yet, hundreds of people including journalists, activists, cartoonists, entrepreneurs, writers, politicians, and even a farmer who cannot read or write, have been implicated under the Act. Visit our Toolkit, take action and demand justice.
Date: 26 July 2021Ref:ASA 13/4406/2021
RESEARCH
BANGLADESH
CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Bangladesh: Repeal the digital security act and end crackdown on freedom of expression online
I write this letter to bring to your attention the latest findings in a briefing by Amnesty International, which has documented violations of the right to freedom of expression online committed by the Bangladeshi authorities under the Digital Security Act. The 21-page briefing – “NO SPACE FOR DISSENT” – documents emblematic cases of 10 individuals who have been charged or otherwise implicated under the DSA simply for putting out statements of dissent, including the Bangladeshi government’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic and satirizing public officials and other powerful people for their actions.
Date: 26 July 2021Ref:ASA 13/4514/2021
NEWS
BANGLADESH
INTERNET AND SOCIAL MEDIA
Bangladesh: End crackdown on freedom of expression online
Bangladeshi authorities must end the crackdown on people’s right to freedom of expression online and urgently repeal the draconian Digital Security Act (DSA) unless it can be amended in compliance with international human rights law and standards, Amnesty International said in a new briefing released today. The briefing, “No space for dissent” examines cases under the DSA - a law that contains overbroad and vague provisions granting the authorities extensive powers to police the online space - against 10 individuals who have been subjected to a wide range of human rights violations including enforced disappearance, arbitrary detention and torture, simply for criticising powerful people on social media.
Date: 25 July 2021
NEWS
AFRICADEATH PENALTY
Sierra Leone: Abolition of death penalty a major victory
Reacting to the news that Parliament voted on 23 July to abolish the death penalty in Sierra Leone, Amnesty International’s West and Central Africa Director Samira Daoud said: “Parliament’s vote in favour of abolishing the death penalty in Sierra Leone is a major victory for all those who tirelessly campaigned to consign this cruel punishment to history and a strengthening of the protection of the right to life.
Date: 25 July 2021
NEWS
PHILIPPINES
KILLINGS AND DISAPPEARANCES
Philippines: Duterte cannot halt ICC investigation into murderous “war on drugs”
Responding to news that Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is still refusing to allow the government to cooperate with the International Criminal Court (ICC) if it opts to launch a formal probe into his murderous “war on drugs”, even after the Supreme Court of the Philippines ruled to the contrary, Amnesty International’s Philippines Researcher, Rachel Chhoa-Howard said: “Despite President Duterte’s stubborn refusal, Amnesty International welcomes the Supreme Court’s ruling that the Philippines remains obliged to cooperate with the ICC during formal probes into the deadly “war on drugs” – even if the state has withdrawn from the Rome Statute.
Date: 23 July 2021
NEWS
BELARUSFREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION
Belarus: Sweeping closure of dozens of NGOs as the crackdown on civil society continues
Responding to the news that the Belarusian authorities have dissolved at least 46 human rights and other civil society organizations, Marie Struthers, Amnesty International’s Director for Eastern Europe and Central Asia, said: “Today is another dark day that will go down in the history of Belarus. Undeterred, the Belarusian authorities are pushing in their unprecedented and increasingly brutal attack on civic space, all forms of opposition or peaceful dissent.
Date: 23 July 2021
NEWS
Scale of secretive cyber surveillance ‘an international human rights crisis’ in which NSO Group is complicit
The vast scale of violations perpetrated through secretive cyber surveillance has exposed a global human rights crisis, Amnesty International warned today, in a new briefing published following the revelations of the Pegasus Project investigation. The briefing, Uncovering the Iceberg: The Digital Surveillance Crisis Wrought by States and the Private Sector, reveals the devastating impact of the poorly regulated spyware industry on human rights worldwide.
Date: 23 July 2021
NEWS
MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA
CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Iran: Security forces use live ammunition and birdshot to crush Khuzestan protests
Iran’s security forces have deployed unlawful force, including by firing live ammunition and birdshot, to crush mostly peaceful protests taking place across the southern province of Khuzestan, Amnesty International said today. Video footage from the past week, coupled with consistent accounts from the ground, indicate security forces used deadly automatic weapons, shotguns with inherently indiscriminate ammunition, and tear gas to disperse protesters.
Date: 23 July 2021
RESEARCH
TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Uncovering the Iceberg: The Digital Surveillance Crisis Wrought by States and the Private Sector
The Pegasus Project has revealed how states’ use of the targeted digital surveillance tools supplied by NSO Group threatens human rights. In this briefing, Amnesty International highlights key insights, such as the improper breadth of targeting under international human rights law; the tool’s clandestine nature; the severe resulting human rights violations; states and companies’ impunity; and states’ failure to protect their residents from illegal hacking and surveillance.
Date: 23 July 2021Ref:DOC 10/4491/2021
CAMPAIGNS
BELARUSDEMONSTRATIONS
Belarus: Further information: Pratasevich and Sapega under house arrest
Belarusian journalist Raman Pratasevich and his partner Sofya Sapega have been moved from pretrial detention to house arrest and no longer appear to be at imminent risk of torture and other ill-treatment. They were arbitrarily detained by the Belarusian authorities on 23 May, after their Ryanair flight was illegally forced to land in Minsk, Belarus’ capital. Amnesty International will continue calling for their immediate release.
Date: 23 July 2021Ref:EUR 49/4511/2021
CAMPAIGNS
RUSSIAN FEDERATION
CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Russian Federation: Further information: Danish Jehovah's Witness remains in prison: Dennis Christensen
Danish Jehovah’s Witness Dennis Christensen continues to be imprisoned in Russia. His repeated requests to have his sentenced commuted have been rejected. His sentence expires in May 2022. During his imprisonment Dennis Christensen has been denied adequate medical care, and faced harassment and arbitrary reprimands. In March, the Kursk Regional Court found several reprimands unjustified. In June, Dennis Christensen was finally transferred to another penal colony for a planned medical examination.
Date: 23 July 2021Ref:EUR 46/4509/2021
RESEARCH
AMERICAS
CENSORSHIP AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Venezuela: Human rights lose whilst impunity prevails: Amnesty International submission for the UN Universal Periodic Review, 40th session of the UPR working group, January 2022
Amnesty International submission for the Universal Periodic Review on Venezuela. This submission includes an analysis of the recommendations made in the previous review, the national human rights framework and the current human rights situation in the country. Amnesty International formulates a series of recommendations for this cycle of review.
Date: 23 July 2021Ref:AMR 53/4488/2021
RESEARCH
TIMOR-LESTECLIMATE CHANGE
Timor-Leste: Enhancing equality and inclusion: Amnesty International submission for the UN Universal Periodic Review, 40th session of the UPR Working Group, January-February 2022
Amnesty International makes this submission to the United Nations as part of the Universal Periodic Review of human rights in Timor-Leste. The submission covers a range of human rights issues including freedom of expression and peaceful assembly, violence against women and girls and the rights of people of diverse sexual orientation, gender identity and expression and sex characteristics, and the rights of people with disability.
Date: 23 July 2021Ref:ASA 57/4499/2021
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