cnbc.com
DEFENSE
Saudi Arabia says it intercepts Houthi missile fired toward Riyadh, no reported damage
PUBLISHED TUE, DEC 19 20177:42 AM ESTUPDATED TUE, DEC 19 20178:38 AM EST
SHARE
KEY POINTS
A spokesman for the Houthi movement said a ballistic missile targeted the royal court at al-Yamama palace, where a meeting of Saudi leaders was underway
The attack happened hours before Saudi Arabia was due to announce the country’s annual budget in a news conference expected to be attended by senior ministers
Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional foe, has denied supplying such weaponry to the Houthis who have taken over the Yemeni capital Sanaa and other parts of the country during its civil war
Play video on original page
VIDEO00:37
Saudi Arabia intercepts missiles fired by rebels
Saudi air defenses intercepted a ballistic missile fired towards the capital Riyadh on Tuesday but there were no reports of casualties, the Saudi-led coalition said, the latest in a series of attacks by an Iran-aligned group in Yemen.

A spokesman for the Houthi movement said a ballistic missile targeted the royal court at al-Yamama palace, where a meeting of Saudi leaders was underway.

There was no official word on this assertion, but a royal family member appeared to confirm the missile was aimed at a royal palace meeting.

“Coalition forces confirm intercepting an Iranian-Houthi missile targeting (the) south of Riyadh.

There are no reported casualties at this time,” the government-run Center for International Communication wrote on its Twitter account.

The attack happened hours before Saudi Arabia was due to announce the country’s annual budget in a news conference expected to be attended by senior ministers.

Reuters witnesses described hearing a blast and said they saw smoke in the north-east of Riyadh.

Saudi Arabia said on Nov. 4 it had intercepted a ballistic missile over Riyadh’s King Khaled Airport, in an attack that provoked a strong reaction from the kingdom.

Riyadh accused Iran of smuggling the missile to the Houthis and imposed a blockade on Yemen demanding that United Nations inspection procedures be tightened.

Last week the United States presented for the first time pieces of what it said were Iranian weapons supplied to the Houthis, describing it as conclusive evidence that Tehran was violating U.N. resolutions.

Iran, Saudi Arabia’s regional foe, has denied supplying such weaponry to the Houthis who have taken over the Yemeni capital Sanaa and other parts of the country during its civil war.

In Geneva, a U.N. human rights spokesman said air strikes by a Saudi-led military coalition had killed at least 136 civilians and non-combatants in Yemen since December 6.
TRENDING NOW
Parents of ‘exceptionally resilient and successful kids’ do these 7 ‘intense’ things, says psychologist
Ethereum is over $4,000—here’s how much you’d have if you invested $1,000 at the beginning of 2021
As more states end federal unemployment benefits early, workers are put in a bind
Pfizer scientist says mRNA technology used for Covid vaccines could create ‘more potent’ flu shots
Former Trump tax lawyer owned shell company created by mystery investors in $100 million NJ deli
Contact
News Tips
Got a confidential news tip? We want to hear from you.
CNBC Newsletters
Sign up for free newsletters and get more CNBC delivered to your inbox

Get this delivered to your inbox, and more info about our products and services. 
Privacy Policy
Do Not Sell My Personal Information
CA Notice
Terms of Service
© 2021 CNBC LLC. All Rights Reserved. A Division of NBCUniversal
Data is a real-time snapshot *Data is delayed at least 15 minutes. Global Business and Financial News, Stock Quotes, and Market Data and Analysis.
Market Data Terms of Use and Disclaimers
Data also provided by