Have library access? Log in through your library
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Some Social Requisites of Democracy: Economic Development and Political Legitimacy
Seymour Martin Lipset
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 53, No. 1 (Mar., 1959), pp. 69-105 (37 pages)
Published By: American Political Science Association
https://doi.org/10.2307/1951731
https://www.​jstor​.org​/stable/1951731
Cite this Item
Read and download
Log in through your school or library
Preview
Journal Information
The American Political Science Review (APSR) is the longest running publication of the American Political Science Association (APSA). APSR, first published in November 1906 and appearing quarterly, is the preeminent political science journal in the United States and internationally. APSR features research from all fields of political science and contains an extensive book review section of the discipline. In its earlier days, APSR also covered the personal and personnel items of the profession as had its predecessor, the Proceedings of the APSA.
Publisher Information
Founded in 1903, the American Political Science Association is the major professional society for individuals engaged in the study of politics and government. APSA brings together political scientists from all fields of inquiry, regions, and occupational endeavors. While most APSA members are scholars who teach and conduct research in colleges and universities in the U.S. and abroad, one-fourth work outside academe in government, research, organizations, consulting firms, the news media, and private enterprise. For more information about the APSA, its publications and programs, please see the APSA website.
Rights & Usage
This item is part of a JSTOR Collection.
For terms and use, please refer to our Terms and Conditions
The American Political Science Review © 1959 American Political Science Association
Request Permissions
Explore JSTOR
For Librarians
For Publishers

JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways.
©2000-2021 ITHAKA. All Rights Reserved. JSTOR®, the JSTOR logo, JPASS®, Artstor®, Reveal Digital™ and ITHAKA® are registered trademarks of ITHAKA.
Terms & Conditions of Use
Privacy Policy
Cookie Policy
Accessibility
ITHAKA websites use cookies for different purposes, such as to ensure web site function, display non-targeted ads, provide social media features, and track usage. You may manage non-essential cookies in “Cookie Settings”. For more information, please see our Cookie Policy.
JSTOR Home Log in RegisterSearchAdvanced SearchImage SearchBrowseby Subjectby Titleby Collectionsby PublisherToolsWorkspaceText AnalyzerThe JSTOR Understanding SeriesData for ResearchAboutSupportLog inRegister