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JOURNAL ARTICLE
The Challenge of Global Health
Laurie Garrett
Foreign Affairs
Vol. 86, No. 1 (Jan. - Feb., 2007), pp. 14-38 (25 pages)
Published By: Council on Foreign Relations
https://www.​jstor​.org​/stable/20032209
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Abstract
Thanks to a recent extraordinary rise in public and private giving, today more money is being directed toward the world's poor and sick than ever before. But unless these efforts start tackling public health in general instead of narrow, disease-specific problems--and unless the brain drain from the developing world can be stopped--poor countries could be pushed even further into trouble, in yet another tale of well-intended foreign meddling gone awry.
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Founded in 1921, the Council on Foreign Relations is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher dedicated to being a resource for its members, government officials, business executives, journalists, educators and students, civic and religious leaders, and other interested citizens in order to help them better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other countries. The Council sponsors several hundred meetings each year, provides up-to-date information and analysis on its website (CFR.org), and publishes Foreign Affairs, the preeminent journal in the field, as well as dozens of other reports and books by noted experts.
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