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JOURNAL ARTICLE
Reconsidering the Robustness of Authoritarianism in the Middle East: Lessons from the Arab Spring
Eva Bellin
Comparative Politics
Vol. 44, No. 2 (January 2012), pp. 127-149 (23 pages)
Published By: Comparative Politics, Ph.D. Programs in Political Science, City University of New York
https://www.​jstor​.org​/stable/23211807
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Abstract
The events of the Arab Spring have suggested the necessity of rethinking the logic of authoritarian persistence in the Arab world. However, the internal variation in regime collapse and survival observed in the region confirms earlier analyses that the comportment of the coercive apparatus, especially its varying will to repress, is pivotal to determining the durability of the authoritarian regimes. At the same time, the trajectory of the Arab Spring highlights an empirical novelty for the Arab world, namely, the manifestation of huge, cross-class, popular protest in the name of political change, as well as a new factor that abetted the materialization of this phenomenon—the spread of social media. The latter will no doubt be a game changer for the longevity of authoritarian regimes worldwide from now on.
Journal Information
Comparative Politics is an international journal that publishes scholarly articles devoted to the comparative analysis of political institutions and behavior. It was founded in 1968 to further the development of comparative political theory and the application of comparative theoretical analysis to the empirical investigation of political issues. Comparative Politics communicates new ideas and research findings to social scientists, scholars, and students. It is indispensable to experts in research organizations, foundations, consulates, and embassies throughout the world. Comparative Politics is sponsored, edited, and published by the Ph.D. Program in Political Science of the City University of New York. Opinions, findings, or conclusions expressed in the journal are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors or the City University of New York. Comparative Politics is published quarterly in January, April, July, and October.
Publisher Information
The Ph.D. Program in Political Science of the City University of New York, located in the Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York at 365 Fifth Avenue in New York, consists of a community of scholars dedicated to the tasks of acquiring, expanding, and transmitting reliable knowledge about political phenomena. Its essential function is to educate professional political scientists capable of independent research and qualified for careers in academic institutions, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and the private sector. Although the Ph.D. Program in Political Science features a diversity of approaches, all students are expected both to specialize and to develop an understanding of the discipline as a whole. Comparative Politics was founded by the Political Science Program of the City University of New York in 1968 to further its scholarly mission by promoting research in the field of comparative politics and is an integral part of its contribution to the discipline of political science.
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Comparative Politics © 2012 Comparative Politics, Ph.D. Programs in Political Science, City University of New York
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