Have library access? Log in through your library
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Corruption Around the World: Causes, Consequences, Scope, and Cures
Vito Tanzi
Staff Papers (International Monetary Fund)
Vol. 45, No. 4 (Dec., 1998), pp. 559-594 (36 pages)
Published By: Palgrave Macmillan Journals
https://doi.org/10.2307/3867585
https://www.​jstor​.org​/stable/3867585
Cite this Item
Read and download
Log in through your school or library
Preview
Abstract
Corruption is attracting a lot of attention around the world. This paper surveys and discusses issues related to the causes, consequences, and scope of corruption, and possible corrective actions. It emphasizes the costs of corruption in terms of economic growth. It also emphasizes that the fight against corruption may not be cheap and cannot be independent from the reform of the state. If certain reforms are not made, corruption is likely to continue to be a problem regardless of actions directly aimed at curtailing it.
Publisher Information
Palgrave Macmillan is a global academic publisher, serving learning and scholarship in higher education and the professional world. We publish textbooks, journals, monographs, professional and reference works in print and online. Our programme focuses on the Humanities, the Social Sciences and Business. As part of the Macmillan Group, we represent an unbroken tradition of 150 years of independent academic publishing, continually reinventing itself for the future. Our goal is to be publisher of choice for all our stakeholders – for authors, customers, business partners, the academic communities we serve and the staff who work for us. We aim to do this by reaching the maximum readership with works of the highest quality.
Rights & Usage
This item is part of a JSTOR Collection.
For terms and use, please refer to our Terms and Conditions
Staff Papers (International Monetary Fund) © 1998 International Monetary Fund
Request Permissions
Explore JSTOR
For Librarians
For Publishers

JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not-for-profit organization helping the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways.
©2000-2021 ITHAKA. All Rights Reserved. JSTOR®, the JSTOR logo, JPASS®, Artstor®, Reveal Digital™ and ITHAKA® are registered trademarks of ITHAKA.
Terms & Conditions of Use
Privacy Policy
Cookie Policy
Accessibility
ITHAKA websites use cookies for different purposes, such as to ensure web site function, display non-targeted ads, provide social media features, and track usage. You may manage non-essential cookies in “Cookie Settings”. For more information, please see our Cookie Policy.
JSTOR Home Log in RegisterSearchAdvanced SearchImage SearchBrowseby Subjectby Titleby Collectionsby PublisherToolsWorkspaceText AnalyzerThe JSTOR Understanding SeriesData for ResearchAboutSupportLog inRegister