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INTL
UK
CULTURE
Who is Bob Dylan?
As the songwriter turns 80, New Statesman contributors reflect on the many facets of his character and career. 
BY NEW STATESMAN
BOOKS
The ruthless, self-questioning brilliance of Janet Malcolm
The New Yorker journalist, who has died aged 86, was one of the greatest practitioners of her trade, as well as its most penetrating interrogator.
BY LEO ROBSON
18 JUNE
PERFORMING ARTS
BBC Radio 4’s Song of the Reed is a thoughtful drama about the natural world
Recorded on location at the RSPB Strumpshaw Fen, the programme is peppered with birdsong and the buzz of grasshoppers, giving it a lively, absorbing feel. 
BY ELLEN PEIRSON-HAGGER
16 JUNE
FILM & TV
BBC Two’s Together is cheap and obvious pandemic piggybacking
In this tedious and excruciating film, Sharon Horgan and James McAvoy play a warring couple trapped together in lockdown. 
BY RACHEL COOKE
16 JUNE
FILM & TV
Ben Wheatley’s In the Earth is a trippy eco-horror
A well-meaning scientist with an interest in mushrooms travels to a remote ecological centre in the aftermath of an unspecified, disastrous plague. 
BY PHILIPPA SNOW
16 JUNE
ART & DESIGN
John Vanderlyn’s art of the New World
Why the artist was hailed by Aaron Burr as “the first painter that now is or ever has been in America”. 
BY MICHAEL PRODGER
16 JUNE
BOOKS
Reviewed in Short: New books by Gillian Tett, Ruth Scurr, Edward White and Sjón
Anthro-Vision by Tett, Napoleon: A Life in Gardens and Shadows by Scurr, The Twelve Lives of Alfred Hitchcock by White and Red Milk by Sjón,
BY NEW STATESMAN
16 JUNE
BOOKS
What we can learn from Giuseppe Garibaldi
In the 19th century Garibaldi united a divided country. Today’s polarised politics could benefit from his pragmatic idealism.
BY JEREMY CLIFFE
16 JUNE
BOOKS
Covid and the rise of the non-place
The pandemic has destroyed countless community and public assets, but the power of local identity remains vital to our recovery.
 
BY KEN WORPOLE
16 JUNE
PERFORMING ARTS
How Joni Mitchell’s Blue became pop music’s ultimate expression of loving and leaving
Fifty years on, the record still feels like a puff of air between your ribs.  
BY KATE MOSSMAN
16 JUNE
BOOKS
David Diop Q&A: “I don’t have a theme tune. I like songs to take me away from me”
The French novelist reflects on the work of Nelson Mandela, being painted by Chagall and 18th century French literature. 
BY NEW STATESMAN
16 JUNE
NATURE
In my newly wildlife-friendly garden, damselflies mate to a soundtrack of London traffic
There are more bees in the garden than I have ever seen before, more butterflies, more moths, more everything. 
BY TRACEY THORN
16 JUNE
TRAVEL
Douglas Kennedy's Diary: The orchestra’s return, US abortion wars, and how to be a traveller in the time of Covid
Since last summer I have loitered with intent in Switzerland, Sicily and Greece. Am I a modern-day Typhoid Mary? 
BY DOUGLAS KENNEDY
16 JUNE
LIFE
Are we really experiencing a summer of love?
In June, dating app activity surged. But this doesn't necessarily mean a summer of casual dating.
BY ELEANOR PEAKE AND KATHARINE SWINDELLS
15 JUNE
LIFE
Can Covid free us from the saccharine charade of wedding culture?
Lockdown has caused misery for those whose events have been planned for years – but why do we still hanker after the big white wedding anyway?
BY EMILY BOOTLE
11 JUNE
PERFORMING ARTS
Sunshine and seduction: Lorde’s “Solar Power” is playfully intoxicating
Released during the solar eclipse, Lorde’s first song in four years is an uplifting ode to the summer.
BY ELLEN PEIRSON-HAGGER
11 JUNE
ART & DESIGN
Anthony Weiner shows the downsides to the NFT meme boom
The ex-Congressman and convicted sex offender raises the question: can the commodification of shame really bring about ethical redemption?
BY SARAH MANAVIS
11 JUNE
FILM & TV
The Underground Railroad, “trauma porn” and the black gaze
Barry Jenkins’s exploration of slavery in The Underground Railroad is undeniably traumatic to watch. But does that make it “trauma porn”?
BY MICHA FRAZER-CARROLL
10 JUNE
BOOKS
The Bench by Meghan Markle: It is mind-boggling how bad this book is
Many parents wonder how hard it is to write a children's book. But this collection of platitudes about paternal love is barely readable.
BY SOPHIE MCBAIN
10 JUNE
BOOKS
Everyone and no one belongs to New York
Two new books capture the resilient spirit of New York City – and the people who call it home. 
BY ERICA WAGNER
09 JUNE
FILM & TV
Jimmy McGovern's new prison drama Time is full of captivating performances
Sean Bean and Stephen Graham are utterly sensational in portraying two men trapped inside. 
BY RACHEL COOKE
09 JUNE
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