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Art
The Women of Magnum Photos
“If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” So said Robert Capa, who co-founded the Magnum Photos collective in 1947. The exhibition “Close Enough: New Perspectives from 12 Women Photographers of Magnum,” opening on Sept. 30 at the International Center of Photography, includes Myriam Boulos’s...READ MORE »
Night Life
Lizzo
In 2019, the singer and rapper Lizzo ascended to pop-star status when “Truth Hurts,” her snappy single from two years prior, resurfaced as a viral No. 1 hit. Known up to that point for her versatile vocal performances, her focus on body and sex positivity, and, of course, her flute,...READ MORE »
The Theatre
A Raisin in the Sun
We just can’t quit the Youngers. Since its groundbreaking Broadway première, in 1959, Lorraine Hansberry’s “A Raisin in the Sun” has returned in starry revivals and high-school syllabi, revered and reframed (as in Bruce Norris’s 2010 spinoff, “Clybourne Park”) and reckoned with across the decades. But the...READ MORE »
Movies
The Potemkinists
Though feature films have always been the core of the New York Film Festival (the sixtieth edition runs Sept. 30 through Oct. 16), the program reliably includes a selection of notable shorts. Two of the best in this year’s batch belie their brevity with their vast historical scope. “Lesser...READ MORE »
Art
“Who Speaks for the Oceans?”
Few people are better qualified to answer the question “Who Speaks for the Oceans?” than David Gruber, a marine biologist and whale whisperer who founded Project ceti—the Cetacean Translation Initiative. Gruber is also a distinguished professor at Baruch College, where, during the past three years, he joined a...READ MORE »
Tables for Two
Newish Jewish, at Kossar’s and Beyond
In Mimi Sheraton’s book “The Bialy Eaters,” from 2000, she entertains, and soundly dismisses, a theory that the bialy, a bagel-adjacent Jewish roll, originated not in Bialystok, Poland, but in New York. Bialys—which are not boiled before they’re baked; which have shallow depressions at their centers...READ MORE »
The Theatre
The Burdens of History, in “The Piano Lesson”
“The Piano Lesson,” the fourth installment in August Wilson’s ten-play cycle chronicling twentieth-century African American life, reckons with the burdens of history. The Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, set in Depression-era Pittsburgh, follows a family tussling over an heirloom: a piano carved with the faces of enslaved ancestors. LaTanya Richardson Jackson’...READ MORE »
Night Life
Medicine Singers
Some of this year’s most scintillating sounds come from Medicine Singers, a collaboration conjoining the scorched-earth Israeli-born guitarist Yonatan Gat with members of Eastern Medicine Singers, a dramatic Algonquin drum group based in Rhode Island. Medicine Singers’ self-titled album, the opening blast from Gat’s Stone Tapes recording imprint,...READ MORE »
The Theatre
Get Your Ass in the Water and Swim Like Me
In 2017, the performer Eric Berryman teamed up with the stalwart downtown-theatre collective the Wooster Group to stage a “record album interpretation.” It was a genre that the Wooster Group had already concocted, when it brought to life an album of early Shaker spirituals, in 2014, resulting in something between...READ MORE »
Art
Matthew Ritchie
Have you heard the latest rumor that painting is dead? The alleged crime scene was the Colorado State Fair, where a picture made by an algorithm won a blue ribbon. For compelling proof that painting is, in fact, alive and thriving in the age of A.I., see “The Garden...READ MORE »
Movies
American Hot Wax
An artistic highlight of the twenty-year nostalgia cycle that brought the nineteen-fifties back in the seventies is “American Hot Wax,” the 1978 bio-pic of the seminal rock-and-roll d.j. and impresario Alan Freed. (It’s showing Sept. 27 on TCM and then streaming through Sept. 30 on Watch TCM.) The...READ MORE »
Tables for Two
The Mayor’s Usual, at Osteria La Baia
The other night at Osteria La Baia, a “coastal Italian” restaurant that opened last year, in midtown, a genial manager asked my party how we’d heard about the place. As we began to stammer an awkward reply, she cut in—“You walked by and saw our car out...READ MORE »
The Theatre
Little Amal, a Symbol of Refugees
Standing twelve feet tall, Little Amal, a ten-year-old Syrian girl designed by South Africa’s Handspring Puppet Company, has travelled through Europe, meeting with Pope Francis, Jude Law, and Ukrainian refugees in Poland. Inspired by Joe Murphy and Joe Robertson’s play “The Jungle,” from 2017, about a migrant camp...READ MORE »
Art
“Cataclysm: The 1972 Diane Arbus Retrospective Revisited”
Fifty years ago, a posthumous retrospective of a New York photographer broke attendance records for a one-person show at moma. Crowds lined up around the block to see a hundred and thirteen black-and-white pictures by Diane Arbus, a relative unknown whose brilliance was already an open secret among her peers....READ MORE »
The Theatre
Crossing the Line
The French Institute Alliance Française pops up in venues throughout the city for its annual Crossing the Line Festival, a rare and all-too-brief opportunity to see French-speaking artists making theatre, music, art, and dance. This year, the lineup includes Marion Siéfert’s multimedia Instagram monodrama, “_jeanne_dark_,” in which a...READ MORE »
Night Life
Rosalía
In 2017, the Spanish singer and songwriter Rosalía emerged as a daring experimentalist, warping traditional flamenco to fit the modern pop soundscape. In the years since her dramatic breakthrough album, “El Mal Querer,” released in 2018, she has extended her range to include urbano music, bringing her particular sense of...READ MORE »
Movies
Nainsukh
Many movies about painters aspire to be painterly; Amit Dutta’s 2010 drama “Nainsukh,” a bio-pic about the eighteenth-century Indian artist, fulfills that ambition spectacularly. It’s a highlight of moma’s series “Making Waves: A New Generation of Indian Independent Filmmakers,” running through Oct. 12. (It’s also streaming...READ MORE »
Tables for Two
Dimes Square, Post-Shark-Jump
One recent Saturday evening at Le Dive—a new wine bar on the corner of Canal and Ludlow Streets, from the people behind Brooklyn’s Le Crocodile—I watched a foursome seat themselves at a couple of unoccupied café tables outside, as one might in the Eleventh Arrondissement....​READ MORE »
Night Life
The DiscOasis, a Sparkly Throwback
New York’s roller discos may have dwindled since the Koch era, but this summer a sparkly throwback called the DiscOasis has materialized at Central Park’s Wollman Rink, complete with mirror balls and Donna Summer anthems. Lorded over by the disco-funk veteran Nile Rodgers, who curated the music, the...READ MORE »
Night Life
Afropunk Brooklyn
The Afropunk Brooklyn festival has shape-shifted radically since it began in the mid-two-thousands as a grassroots celebration of Black alternative music rooted in punk. Now expanded, with a capacious spirit of community manifested in iterations around the world, Afropunk emphasizes the vastness of Black musical expression, with acts representing rap,...READ MORE »
Art
“Our Selves”
In the nineteen-eighties, after four decades as a psychotherapist in St. Louis, Helen Kornblum began collecting photographs by women artists; in 2021, Kornblum donated a hundred pieces to moma, where “Our Selves,” a rich exhibition excerpting that gift, is on view through Oct. 10. The show’s title recalls that...READ MORE »
Podcasts
Björk: Sonic Symbolism
The Icelandic musician Björk makes albums that are difficult to classify. Are they rock? Folk? Experimental pop? A dreamy mishmash of performance, visual, and outsider art? On the new podcast “Björk: Sonic Symbolism,” from Talkhouse and Mailchimp Presents, the woodland-fairy-voiced singer works through these questions. Each episode explores the creation...READ MORE »
Movies
Street Smart
Morgan Freeman earned his first Oscar nomination for his portrayal of a violent, scarily manipulative pimp called Fast Black in Jerry Schatzberg’s hard-edged 1987 drama set in New York, “Street Smart” (streaming on Tubi and on Pluto TV). The character, rooted in stereotypes, anchors a story that holds a...READ MORE »
Tables for Two
The More-Is-More Pizzazz of Gugu Room
The Filipino-Japanese izakaya Gugu Room, on the Lower East Side, has a few origin stories. The most romantic has to do with José Rizal, a national hero of the Philippines, who had a brief love affair with a Japanese samurai’s daughter, in 1888, during a six-week pit stop in...READ MORE »
Art
The Colorful Art of Nellie Mae Rowe
The American artist Nellie Mae Rowe (1900-82) was in her sixties—twice widowed, and retired from decades of domestic service—when she began to transform her Atlanta home into what she called her “playhouse,” filling it, inside and out, with her found-object assemblages, enchanting soft sculptures, and colorful...READ MORE »
Night Life
Demi Lovato: “Holy Fvck”
Demi Lovato’s album “Dancing with the Devil . . . The Art of Starting Over,” from 2021, arrived amid a confessional breakthrough. As a complement to her revealing documentary about working through breakups, managing an eating disorder, being sexually assaulted, and suffering a near-fatal drug overdose, the singer performed sweeping ballads and...READ MORE »
Art
“Writing a Chrysanthemum: The Drawings of Rick Barton”
Three months before the Morgan Library opened its doors to the public, in 1928, Rick Barton—a remarkable draftsman who died in obscurity in 1992—was born a few blocks away. Now, thanks to the discerning eye and considerable detective work of the museum’s associate curator Rachel...READ MORE »
Podcasts
Fine Gorilla Person
If you grew up in the nineteen-eighties or nineties, you’ve likely heard about Koko, the female lowland gorilla born into captivity, in 1971, at the San Francisco Zoo and thrust into global fame because of her remarkable ability to communicate with humans. From an early age, Koko showed an...READ MORE »
Movies
The Cathedral
Since 2015, the filmmaker Ricky D’Ambrose has been crafting a unique form of cinematic fiction that combines live action and voice-over narration, faux documents and authentic archival footage, to dramatize the inseparability of private lives and social history. His new, quasi-autobiographical feature, “The Cathedral” (opening on Sept. 2 and...READ MORE »
Tables for Two
Fried Chicken Three Ways
You can have your pâté and truffles, your caviar and Wagyu—but one thing I would pick over those (or in addition to those), anytime, is fried chicken. There are so many places to get so many styles of fried chicken in New York City that you could eat...READ MORE »
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