The New Yorker Radio Hour
The Newspaperman Who Championed Black Tulsa
With David Remnick
June 18, 2021

Illustration by Golden Cosmos
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David Remnick profiled Naftali Bennett when he was a rising star in Israeli politics. Now, as Prime Minister, Bennett leads a coalition government that includes leftists and an Arab-Israeli party, but nothing seems likely to shake Bennett’s hard line on the Palestinian question. Plus, a look at A. J. Smitherman, who founded one of the country’s first Black-owned dailies, in Tulsa’s Greenwood district. Smitherman addressed his eloquence and his ire at civic nuisances and at the gravest injustices of American life. He documented Greenwood at its height, in the years before the Tulsa Massacre, and he tried to prevent its destruction.
Naftali Bennett and the New Hard Line in Israeli Politics
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Israel’s new coalition government includes leftists and an Arab-Israeli party, but nothing seems likely to shake the Prime Minister’s hard line on the Palestinian question.
The Newspaperman Who Championed Black Tulsa
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A. J. Smitherman founded one of the first Black-owned dailies. He addressed his eloquence and his ire at civic nuisances and at the gravest injustices of American life.
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Palestine
Israel
Racial Injustice in America
Oklahoma
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