DOI:10.1038/nature06335
Corpus ID: 4301427
Into the mind of a fly
L. Vosshall
Published 8 November 2007
Biology, Medicine
Nature
Where do animal behaviours come from and are they controlled by genes? This is the fundamental question posed by the field of neurogenetics. Pioneering work from the 1960s in Seymour Benzer’s… Expand
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