DOI:​10.1177/00238309030460040201
Corpus ID: 14066461
Perception of English Intonation by English, Spanish, and Chinese Listeners
E. Grabe, B. Rosner, +1 author Xiaolin Zhou
Published 2003
Psychology, Medicine

Language and Speech
Native language affects the perception of segmental phonetic structure, of stress, and of semantic and pragmatic effects of intonation. Similarly, native language might influence the perception of… Expand
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Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements
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