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FEATURE
Italian recipe of the week: The perfect spaghetti carbonara
It has just three ingredients, but a lot of bite: artisan pasta maker Silvana Lanzetta shares her recipe for the perfect carbonara sauce.
Published: 19 February 2021 11:08 CET
An authentic carbonara sauce has only three ingredients. Photo: Flickr/Wine Dharma
Pasta alla carbonara (literally translated as 'coal workers’ pasta') is one of the most well-known and loved Italian delicacies: the creaminess of the eggs contrasting with the crispy guanciale makes it a pleasure to eat.
The origins of carbonara sauce are still uncertain. However, the recipe doesn’t appear until 1944, which prompts some speculations on how this delicious recipe came to be.
READ ALSO: The original recipe for authentic bolognese sauce
The most widely recognized theory is that this beloved Italian dish is an American adaptation of the traditional cacio e ova: when the Allied troops were stationed in Italy toward the end of World War Two, they got fond of pasta cacio e pepe, but to give them a “back home” flavour, they added smoked bacon to the recipe.
Roman people enthusiastically adopted the new dish, and quickly added it to their cooking.
They swapped the bacon for guanciale (the fat from a pig’s cheek) as they already had pasta recipes using guanciale and Pecorino cheese, the other two being pasta alla gricia and bucatini all’amatriciana.
Tips
Don't use Parmesan cheese for this recipe. However, if you're having difficulties finding guanciale, pancetta can be used instead.
Never add cream to the recipe: the creaminess is given by the sheer amount of grated Pecorino – so don't skimp on it! 
READ ALSO: Silvana's ten golden rules for cooking pasta like the Italians
Ingredients
Method
Step 1:
In a non-stick pan, fry the guanciale in its own fat until slightly crispy, taking care not to brown it too much.
Step 2:
In a large bowl, beat the egg yolks and the whole egg with salt and pepper. Stir in the grated cheese until a thick cream is obtained. Add the cooked guanciale and reserve.
Step 3:
Cook the spaghetti al dente. Reserve about 100 ml of the cooking water. Drain the pasta well, and immediately pour the pasta into the bowl with the eggs. The heat of the pasta will cook the egg.
Step 4:
Add a little bit of the reserved cooking water, and mix well so as to coat all the pasta. If the sauce is still too dense, add some more cooking water. If too runny, stir in more cheese.
Step 5:
If necessary, season with more salt and pepper. Serve immediately sprinkled with extra grated Pecorino cheese.

Silvana Lanzetta. Photo: Private
Silvana Lanzetta was born into a family of pasta makers from Naples and spent 17 years as a part-time apprentice in her grandmother’s pasta factory. She specializes in making pasta entirely by hand and runs regular classes and workshops in London.
Find out more at her website, Pastartist.com, including this recipe and others.
RELATED TOPICS
FEATURE​PASTA​COOKING​RECIPE​ITALIAN FOOD
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ARCHAEOLOGY
Remains of nine Neanderthals found in Italian cave
The fossil remains of nine Neanderthal men have been found in a cave in Italy, the culture ministry announced Saturday, a major discovery in the study of our ancient cousins.
Published: 8 May 2021 16:59 CEST
Photo: MARCO BERTORELLO / AFP
All the individuals found in the Guattari Cave in San Felice Circeo, located on the coast between Rome and Naples, are believed to be adults, although one might have been a youth.
Eight of them date to between 50,000 and 68,000 years ago, while the oldest could be 90,000 or 100,000 years old, the ministry said in a statement.
“Together with two others found in the past on the site, they bring the total number of individuals present in the Guattari Cave to 11, confirming it as one of the most significant sites in the world for the history of Neanderthal man,” the ministry said.
READ ALSO: Ancient Roman home and mosaics unearthed during Italian apartment renovation
Culture Minister Dario Franceschini hailed the find as “an extraordinary discovery which the whole world will be talking about”.
Francesco Di Mario, who led the excavation project, said it represented a Neanderthal population that would have been quite large in the area.
Local director of anthropology Mario Rubini said the discovery will shed “important light on the history of the peopling of Italy”.
“Neanderthal man is a fundamental stage in human evolution, representing the apex of a species and the first human society we can talk about,” he said.
The findings follow new research begun in October 2019 into the Guattari
Cave, which was found by accident by a group of workers in February 1939.
On visiting the site shortly afterwards, paleontologist Albert Carlo Blanc made a stunning find – a well-preserved skull of a Neanderthal man.
The cave had been closed off by an ancient landslide, preserving everything inside as a snapshot in time that is slowly offering up its secrets.
Recent excavations have also found thousands of animal bones, notably those
of hyenas and the prey they are believed to have brought back to the cave to eat or store as food.
There are remains of large mammals including elephant, rhinoceros, giant deer, cave bear, wild horses and aurochs – extinct bovines.
“Many of the bones found show clear signs of gnawing,” the ministry statement said.
AFP
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@thelocalitaly
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