transparency.org
CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX 2017
21 February 2018
Jump to: Results table | Research analysis | Regional analysis | Resources & previous results
This year’s Corruption Perceptions Index highlights that the majority of countries are making little or no progress in ending corruption, while further analysis shows journalists and activists in corrupt countries risking their lives every day in an effort to speak out.
The index, which ranks 180 countries and territories by their perceived levels of public sector corruption according to experts and businesspeople, uses a scale of 0 to 100, where 0 is highly corrupt and 100 is very clean. This year, the index found that more than two-thirds of countries score below 50, with an average score of 43. Unfortunately, compared to recent years, this poor performance is nothing new.
This year, New Zealand and Denmark rank highest with scores of 89 and 88 respectively. Syria, South Sudan and Somalia rank lowest with scores of 14, 12 and 9 respectively. The best performing region is Western Europe with an average score of 66. The worst performing regions are Sub-Saharan Africa (average score 32) and Eastern Europe and Central Asia (average score 34).
Download CPI 2017 XLSX dataset
Since 2012, several countries significantly improved their index score, including Côte d’Ivoire, Senegal and the United Kingdom, while several countries declined, including Syria, Yemen and Australia.
Research analysis
Further analysis of the results indicates that countries with the least protection for press and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) also tend to have the worst rates of corruption.
Every week at least one journalist is killed in a country that is highly corrupt.
The analysis, which incorporates data from the Committee to Protect Journalists, shows that of all journalists who were killed in the last six years, more than 9 out of 10 were killed in countries that score 45 or less on the index.
Full research analysis: Digging deeper into corruption, violence against journalists and active civil society
Read More
No activist or reporter should have to fear for their lives when speaking out against corruption. Given current crackdowns on both civil society and the media worldwide, we need to do more to protect those who speak up.
Play video on original page
Learn more about corruption worldwide and how you can help | Corruption Perceptions Index 2017
Regional Analysis
Learn more about public sector corruption and the index results by region:
Asia Pacific
Sub-Saharan Africa
Middle East & Northern Africa
Americas
Europe & Central Asia: Part I | Part II
CPI results correlate not only with the attacks on press freedom and the reduction of space for civil society organisations. In fact, what is at stake is the very essence of democracy and freedom.
Top Five Recommendations
Our first-hand experience working in more than 100 countries around the world shows that activists and media are vital to combatting corruption. As such, Transparency International calls on the global community to take the following actions to curb corruption:
Governments and businesses must do more to encourage free speech, independent media, political dissent and an open and engaged civil society.
Governments should minimise regulations on media, including traditional and new media, and ensure that journalists can work without fear of repression or violence. In addition, international donors should consider press freedom relevant to development aid or access to international organisations.
Civil society and governments should promote laws that focus on access to information. This access helps enhance transparency and accountability while reducing opportunities for corruption. It is important, however, for governments to not only invest in an appropriate legal framework for such laws, but also commit to their implementation.
Activists and governments should take advantage of the momentum generated by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to advocate and push for reforms at the national and global level. Specifically, governments must ensure access to information and the protection of fundamental freedoms and align these to international agreements and best practices.
Governments and businesses should proactively disclose relevant public interest information in open data formats. Proactive disclosure of relevant data, including government budgets, company ownership, public procurement and political party finances allows journalists, civil society and affected communities to identify patterns of corrupt conduct more efficiently.
Resources and downloads
Press Release: Corruption Perceptions Index 2017 shows high corruption burden in more than two-thirds of countries
| عربي | Español | Français | Русский
Results brochure
Global map graphic and results table: JPG | PDF
Global map graphic: JPG | PDF
Global and regional results graphics (with translations) ZIP
Data set: Full results XLSX
Data Set: Statistically Significant Changes XLSX
FAQ
Short methodology note
Technical methodology note
Source description
Previous Corruption Perceptions Index results
For any press inquiries please contact press@transparency.org
SHARE OUR VISION
Stay informed
Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get the latest news and updates from Transparency International
First name *
Last name *
Email address *
This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. View our Privacy Policy.
Engage
We're active in over 100 countries. Here's how to contact one of our national chapters
Donate
Your support will help us tackle corruption and the corrupt. Take action and donate now to help us end corruption
Donate now
Join the conversation on social media
About
What is corruption?
The organisation
Our story
Our impact
National Chapters
Who We Are
What we do
Corruptions Perceptions Index
Global Corruption Barometer
Our priorities
Advocacy
Projects
Advocacy and legal advice centres
Anti-Corruption Helpdesk
Knowledge Hub
International Anti-Corruption Conference
Anti-Corruption Award
Updates
News
Blog
Press
Library
Corruption
By country
End corruption
Corruptionary A-Z
Report corruption
More
Career & tender opportunities
Contact
How we operate
How we're funded
How we're accountable
Our people

Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under CC BY-ND 4.0
© Transparency International 2021. Some rights reserved.
Privacy
Donor Privacy
Cookies
Terms
Impressum
Copyright enquiries
We use necessary cookies for core website functionality. We'd also like to use additional cookies to offer you a better browsing experience.
Accept all cookies
Set cookie preferences
Home News Corruption Perceptions Index 2017