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Saudi Crown Prince Says Khashoggi Was Killed ‘Under My Watch’
Mohammed bin Salman acknowledges murder that brought international censure, in PBS interview
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Representatives of Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the U.S. have been at odds about what happened to missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, until Saudi Arabia confirmed that he was killed in its consulate in Istanbul. Here’s how each country’s narrative unfolded. Photo: George Downs/The Wall Street Journal (Originally published Oct. 22, 2018)
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Updated Sept. 26, 2019 12:07 pm ET
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Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman acknowledged that the 2018 murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi happened under his watch and that responsibility falls on him, addressing an incident that evoked international criticism of the kingdom.
Mr. Khashoggi, a critic of the Saudi leadership, was brutally killed by government agents inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul in October 2018. A CIA assessment concluded last year that Prince Mohammed ordered the killing. Riyadh has denied the crown prince’s involvement.
“It happened under my watch. I get all the responsibility because it happened under my watch,” the crown prince is quoted as saying in a December 2018 interview with broadcaster PBS, part of a documentary expected to air ahead of the first anniversary of Mr. Khashoggi’s death. PBS released a clip and a summary of the program on Thursday.
Prince Mohammed described the killing as a rogue operation that happened without his knowledge, according to the PBS account, which doesn’t show the crown prince speaking and instead repeats his statements to the broadcaster. “We have 20 million people. We have 3 million government employees,” he is quoted as saying.
The murder shattered the crown prince’s image in global public opinion and strained the kingdom’s alliance with the U.S. Its fallout slowed foreign investment in the kingdom and complicated the crown prince’s plans to overhaul the Saudi economy to make it less dependent on oil.
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