SUBSCRIBESIGN IN
Read the Latest
TAX RECORDS OF THE RICH
SCIENCE SUGGESTS A LAB LEAK
AMERICA'S LABOR SHORTAGE
THE POWER OF NATURAL IMMUNITY
CANCELING MATH CLASS
WOKE CORPORATE POLITICS
OPINION COMMENTARY
Your Woke Money Is No Good Here
Corporations have taken advantage of Republicans for too long. I won’t take their PAC dollars anymore.
By
April 28, 2021 6:37 pm ET
SHARE
TEXT
1,536
James Quincey, chairman and CEO of Coca-Cola, speaks to the press in Mumbai, March 2, 2020.
PHOTO: PUNIT PARANJPE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES
Georgia’s new election law runs 98 generously spaced pages. A fast reader can get through it in one sitting. If you’re the CEO of a major corporation, you can pay someone to do it for you. But I don’t think CEOs took the time to read Georgia’s Election Integrity Act of 2021, because so much of what they said about it was nonsense.
Coca-Cola’s James Quincey said he opposed “measures in the bills that would diminish or deter access to voting.” Which measures? The ones that allow several forms of identification, which the state provides free of charge, to request or cast a ballot? Or the measures that expand the number of days of early voting?
Maybe Mr. Quincey can be forgiven. He’s British, and they’ve been confused about Americans since the Boston Tea Party. But Merck’s Kenneth Frazier said, “Georgia is the leading edge of a movement all around this country to restrict voting access.” Was he referring to the laws’s provision that mandates more ballot boxes? Or the one that shifts Georgia’s electoral oversight to a nonpartisan appointee?
Had these watch-me-woke-it-up CEOs actually read the bill—instead of parroting the radical left’s talking points—they’d have discovered they had no idea what they were talking about. A clutch of business leaders tried to win woke Twitter points and clowned themselves instead.
This is the point in the drama when Republicans usually shrug their shoulders, call these companies “job creators,” and start to cut their taxes. Not this time.
This time, we won’t look the other way on Coca-Cola’s $12 billion in back taxes owed. This time, when Major League Baseball lobbies to preserve its multibillion-dollar antitrust exception, we’ll say no thank you. This time, when Boeing asks for billions in corporate welfare, we’ll simply let the Export-Import Bank expire.
For too long, woke CEOs have been fair-weather friends to the Republican Party: They like us until the left’s digital pitchforks come out. Then they run away. Or they mouth off on legislation they don’t understand—and hurt the reputations of patriotic leaders protecting our elections and expanding the right to vote. Enough is enough. Corporations that flagrantly misrepresent efforts to protect our elections need to be called out, singled out and cut off.
In my nine years in the Senate, I’ve received $2.6 million in contributions from corporate political-action committees. Starting today, I no longer accept money from any corporate PAC. I urge my GOP colleagues at all levels to do the same.
For too long, Republicans have allowed the left and their big-business allies to attack our values with no response. We’ve allowed them to ship jobs overseas, attack gun rights, and destroy our energy companies. We’ve let them smear Republicans without paying any price.
As America’s greatest basketball player observed years ago, Republicans buy sneakers, too. We cast votes, too. And we pay attention when CEOs come after our own just so they can look good for a few editorial pages and radical activists.
To them I say: When the time comes that you need help with a tax break or a regulatory change, I hope the Democrats take your calls, because we may not. Starting today, we won’t take your money either.
Mr. Cruz, a Republican, is a U.S. senator from Texas.
Play video on original page
Play video on original page
Wonder Land: More than 100 corporation leaders have done a Davos by laptop to vilify Republicans and validate their progressive credentials. Image: Getty Images/iStock Photo
Appeared in the April 29, 2021, print edition.
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
Thieves Find Money That Grows on Trees: ‘Avocados Are the Green Gold’
Many Companies Want Remote Workers—Except From Colorado
Tesla and Other Bubble Stocks Have Deflated Just Like 2000
Small Business Needed Federal Help. The Agency in Charge Fell Short.
Tali Farhadian Weinstein Spends Big in Manhattan District Attorney Race
Red-Hot U.S. Economy Drives Global Inflation, Forcing Foreign Banks to Act
Mortgage Companies Are Making Money Off Your Forbearance Plan
WSJ News Exclusive | Costly Brain-Cancer Drug No Longer Covered by Medicare
Proud Boys and Oath Keepers, Forceful on Jan. 6, Privately Are in Turmoil
One Failed Bridge in Memphis Is Costing Business Millions
SPONSORED OFFERS
TARGET:
20% off sitewide - Target Promo Code 2021
MACY'S:
Macy's coupon - Sign up to get 25% off next order
KOHL'S:
30% off Kohl's coupon for Rewards members
SAKS FIFTH AVENUE:
20% off first order - Saks Fifth Avenue promo code
OLD NAVY:
50% off Father's day apparel at Old Navy
PRETTYLITTLETHING:
PrettyLittleThing coupon code: Extra 20% off app orders
UPCOMING EVENTS
June
24
2021
11:00 AM - 5:00 PM EDT
Global Food Forum
June
30
2021
1:00 PM - 1:45 PM EDT
WSJ Pro Cybersecurity Webinar: Aligning IT and Cybersecurity
June
30
2021
7:00 PM - 7:45 PM EDT
WSJ+ Live: Daniel Kahneman and His Co-Authors on the Crisis of ‘Noise’
ADD TO CALENDAR
BACK TO TOP
Edition
WSJ Membership Benefits
Customer Center
Legal Policies
SIGN IN
© 2021 Dow Jones & Company Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
Nikkeipoints with a0.34%▲U.S. 10 Yrwith a1.524%▼Yenpoints with a0.04%▼